Monday, August 11, 2014

Blog Interview: Dr Peter Mead - Cor Deo

In the last of the current series I interview Dr Peter Mead one of the leaders of Cor Deo.

1) Please introduce yourself and your role at Cor Deo.

Ron Frost, Peter Mead, David Searight
& Mike Chalmers
I am a mentor at Cor Deo, a deliberately small mentored training programme based in Chippenham, southern England.  I am also part of the leadership of a local church plant, and leader of the Bible Teacher’s Networks at the European Leadership Forum.

2) Tell us a little about Cor Deo.

Along with Dr Ron Frost, I started Cor Deo several years ago.  We saw a need for a more relationally enriched training approach that would allow participants to be part of a team that can study together, serve together and grow together.  We offer a six-month full-time training programme, one-week Intensive courses and are now in the process of launching a follow-up programme to help past participants go further in their studies and ministry.  Our training blends lots of biblical studies, history in the context of church history and applied theology in all aspects of pastoral ministry.  We have only six spaces available each year for the full-time programme, believing that we would rather pursue a multiplicational approach to training, where we hope to go deeper with a few participants, rather than simply trying to get bigger numbers in to the course.

3) Are the courses full time, part-time or a mixture of both?

The main six-month course is full-time.  The Intensives last just one week.  The new follow-up programme for past participants will be a modular study programme that is part-time and flexible.

4) How do Cor Deo students fund their studies?

We do not charge a fee for participation.  Instead we suggest a donation amount, thereby meaning that financial limitations do not restrict potential participants.  As far as living during the six months, some have lived off savings, others have been supported, others have been given an extended study leave from employment.  Six months is much more manageable than 2-4 years of full-time study!

5) Does Cor Deo take students from overseas?

We can if they are from the EU, but we are not in a position to help people get visas.  If someone can legitimately be in the UK for the necessary time, then we would gladly take them.

6) What type of ministry is Cor Deo intended to prepare students for?

We want to prepare people to go on to serve in their own church, either as pastoral staff, or as lay leaders within the church.  We want to prepare missionaries for further and greater service overseas.  We want to prepare people to go on to further academic theological studies so that they can thrive in that environment.  Our goal is to multiply ministry that shares God’s heart.

7) When students leave Cor Deo what kind of ministries / jobs do they go into?

We have seen past participants go on to all of these next steps: senior pastor, church elder, student ministry, church youth work, overseas missionary, student in further training, as well as people heading back into “secular” work with a missional mindset.

8) What is distinctive about what Cor Deo offers compared with other colleges in the UK and overseas?

Cor Deo offers a uniquely integrated programme of study.  All the mentors are present for every subject area. Participants get full life-on-life access to the mentors, with the option of travelling together for ministry, local ministry exposure, mentoring in their own context, etc.  The programme is focused on exposing participants to biblical study as well as a history of spiritual traditions that gives a framework for understanding contemporary Christian spirituality.  We do not have either a carrot or a stick – that is, there is no certificate at the end of the six month course, and there is no academic pressure to get there, instead there is a shared confidence that the God of the Bible is worth pursuing in fellowship with the team.  Cor Deo is a unique opportunity for personal, theological, spiritual and ministerial growth.

9) Please tell us about the library and other research facilities.

Cor Deo has a small, but focused collection of reference materials that is available to participants.

10) Does Cor Deo offer a distance or on-line learning option? If yes, please tell us more about it.

No, we believe in the importance of face-to-face interaction.  It is in community and in relationship that growth and learning best occur.  There are many good sources of information transfer available, but the opportunity to be part of a group like this is sadly too rare.

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My thanks to Peter Mead for taking part in this series. If I get any more entries I will re-start the series in October.

Monday, August 04, 2014

Blog Interview - Dr Ezra Kok - Seminari Theoloji Malaysia

1) Please tell us about yourself and your role in STM.

Hello! My name is Rev Dr Ezra Kok, the Principal of Seminari Theoloji Malaysia (STM). I am also a lecturer in New Testament studies.

2) Can you tell us more about the history of STM?

STM came into existence as a joint Anglican, Evangelical Lutheran and Methodist venture on the 6 January 1979. For Anglicans and Evangelical Lutherans this marked a further stage in their co-operation in theological education in Malaysia, which had earlier included the Christian Training Centre and Kolej Theoloji Malaysia. Since then, we still holding onto our vision and is thankful to for the many contributions people have made towards the growth and development of STM. The journey of STM began at the ELCM premises at Brickfields (1979-April 1983). Since then, we have moved to the Methodist High School premise in Sentul (June 1983-1991) and from Sentul, we moved to Xavier Hall in Jalan Gasing, Petaling Jaya (1992-1997). For nearly twenty years, STM was nomadic. Finally, in 1998 we shifted to our permanent campus at Seremban in time for the new academic year. During our short history the total number of graduands has exceeded 700 and they are serving in different parts of Malaysia and beyond. Our faculty has increased in qualifications and experience, and we are glad to see that the supporting churches are taking steps to prepare suitably qualified ministers for teaching in the seminary.

3) What courses does STM offer?

We offer undergraduate to postgraduate programs. In the undergraduate programs, a student can pursue the Diploma of Ministry (DipCM), Bachelor of Theology (BTh), Diploma of Theology (DipTh), Bachelor of Divinity (BD), Graduate Diploma of Christian Studies (GradDipCS), Master of Christian Studies (MCS), and Master of Divinity (MDiv).


For the postgraduate programs, a student can pursue the Master of Ministry (MMin) and Doctor of Ministry (DMin) for the professional track and the Master of Theology (MTh) and Doctor of Theology (DTheol) for the research track. (The DTheol is offered through ATU)  We have also courses for the laypeople in the form of Theological Education for Extension (TEE) programs like GradDipCS and MCS for graduates and DipCM and BTh for undergraduates.

4) How do students fund their studies at STM?

The majority of our students come through the recommendation of the different denominational churches and are mainly supported through the conference's or synod's scholarships. We also have students who are supported by local individual churches as well as some students on self sponsorship. Click for more information.

5) Does STM take in foreign students?

In the past, foreign students constituted almost 30% of the student population in STM. In recent years, however, we have encountered some problems procuring student visas for our foreign students. However, foreign students can still study in the postgraduate programs on a part-time basis.

6) What type of ministry does STM prepare students for?

We prepare students mainly for the denominational churches that are our founding and partner churches namely, the Methodist Church in Malaysia, the Anglican Diocese of West Malaysia, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Malaysia, the Lutheran Church of Malaysia, and the Presbyterian Church of Malaysia. The majority of our students enter the ordained ministry of those churches although there are many who also opt for a variety of careers in education, mission organizations, community work, and other church-based ministries.


7) What is distinctive about what STM offers compared with other seminaries in the region?

There are some distinctives about what STM has to offer. Firstly, we have a faculty that is almost 100% local lecturers. Many of them hold a doctorate in their areas of specialization. Secondly, we offer modules on religions and faiths that are part of our unique Malaysian heritage. Thirdly, we are constantly wrestling with the issues of contextualization and indigenization of the Gospel in our multi-pluralistic and multi-cultural settings. Fourthly, our library holdings is one of the best in the region for theological and biblical research and study.

8) Can you tell us something about the library and research facilities?

The Library currently holds approximately 50,000 titles in the various collections, and receives about 250 current journals and periodicals. We also have a reasonable collection of multimedia and audiovisual materials, as well as microfiche. Our archives contain works on Malaysian church history and we are very keen to acquire additional materials to further expand our collection. To keep up with advances in information technology and knowledge management, the catalogue and library management system were fully automated in 2000 and Internet research facilities have been made available. As STM continues to develop and expand its community and programmes, the Library plans to similarly develop and expand by increasing its holdings and improving its facilities in order to offer up-to-date resources as well as a conducive environment for research.

9) Does STM offer distance learning or elearning?

Our main distance learning programs are currently the TEE program located in various centers in Malaysia namely, Seremban, Petaling Jaya (CTEE in Luther House), and in Kuching (housed in Trinity Methodist Church). The TEE program is conducted in four languages namely, English, Chinese, Tamil, and Bahasa Malaysia. We have also other theological centers working closely with STM where their students graduate with a STM certification. These centers are the Ipoh Theological Center (ITC), SiYuan Theological Center in Sitiawan, and the Sekolah Alkitab Malaysia (SAM) in Penang. We are also in the process of monitoring our first overseas center at Lay Academy for Ministry and Missions (LAMM) at Melbourne, which belongs to the Chinese Methodist Church in Australia.
We will be slowly working on other forms of elearning as the need arises.---

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My thanks to Dr Kok for taking part in this series.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Blog Interview – Dr Graham McFarlane – London School of Theology


1) Please introduce yourself and your role at London School of Theology [LST]

I am the Vice-Principal: Academic and Senior Lecturer in Systematic Theology at LST, and serve on the senior leadership team. I am responsible for directing the efforts of our excellent and internationally renowned faculty, developing partnerships with other international organisations, and for providing theological leadership.

2) Tell us a little about LST.


The London Bible College was founded in 1943 by a group of ministers, missionaries and business people with a vision for an interdenominational, evangelical college. Full-time students began studying in 1946 and in 1970 the College moved to Northwood, becoming the London School of Theology in 2004. Currently, LST has over 900 students on undergraduate, postgraduate, PhD and distance-learning programmes studying a range of certificate, diploma and degree courses in Biblical Theology, Music & Worship, and Christian Counselling.

3) Are the courses full time, part-time or a mixture of both?


Courses at LST can be undertaken flexibly, full or part-time.

4) How do LST’s students fund their studies?


Undergraduate students are eligible for UK government student loans towards fees and living costs. US students are able to acquire Sallie Mae loans towards their studies. Many of our students are not in receipt of student loans and fund their studies through savings, fundraising, family and church support. LST also has bursary funds at its disposal and in 12/13, distributed £156,354 worth of bursaries to 78 students.

5) Does LST take students from overseas?


Many of LST’s students are from overseas – typically around 23% of our undergraduates and 58% of postgraduates are international students. The School has highly trusted sponsor status with the UK Borders Agency and is fully licenced to accept Tier 4 Visa students. In addition, we hope to be accredited with the European Union’s Erasmus programme, enabling greater student exchanges across the EU.

6) What type of ministry is LST intended to prepare students for?



Studying at LST prepares students for a diverse range of vocations. Our theological training is evangelical, interdenominational and spiritual, yet highly academic, enabling students to become Church leaders or undertake denominational training, as well as to pursue professional roles in other areas. Degrees in Theology, Music and Worship and Christian Counselling, allow students to explore specific gifts and callings in these areas whilst LST’s Training Department facilitates placements at various organisations, Churches and charities to provide students with vocational experience.

7) When students leave LST what kind of ministries / jobs do they go into.


LST graduates are involved across virtually all areas of Christian ministry including youth work, overseas mission, worship pastoring, and Church leadership as well as in law, international development, academia, journalism and politics. LST alumni include Ruth Valerio, author of ‘L Is For Lifestyle’, Joel Edwards, Director of the Micah Challenge and Steve Clifford, General Director of the Evangelical Alliance. Many of our students also continue studying after to undertake research Masters and PhD’s.

8) What is distinctive about what LST offers compared with other colleges in the UK and overseas?

LST uniquely combines a Christ-centred, pastoral, community with courses that represent evangelical, Bible-based theology and high academic standards. Our faculty (and indeed, our students) represent a broad range of denominations and theological viewpoints, creating an exciting environment of discussion, debate and joint understanding that truly prepares individuals for ‘doing’ theology in the modern world. We also host internationally renowned speakers including Dr. Timothy Tennent, Shane Claiborne, and Heidi Baker at our Laing Lecture and Deo Gloria Lecture.

9) Please tell us about the library and other research facilities.


LST’s library is housed in the former chapel, holds over 50,000 volumes and over 200 periodical titles a year, and is recognised as one of the best specialist theological libraries in the UK. Subscription to the EBSCO Religion & Philosophy Collection™ provides full-text access to articles published in nearly 300 peer-reviewed academic journals.

10) Does LST offer a distance or on-line learning option. If yes, please tell us more about it.


LST offers a distance learning Theology Certificate, Diploma, BA and MA degree and will shortly launch a new MA in Integrative Theology, with seven unique exit points in Social Justice, Theology & Arts, Public Leadership, Worship Studies, Old Testament, New Testament, and Systematic Theology. Students will be able to study this programme residentially, entirely online via a Virtual Learning Environment, or via a combination of both.

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My thanks to Dr McFarlane for taking part in their interview series. London School of Theology's journal, Vox Evangelica is available online <<HERE>>.

Monday, July 21, 2014

Blog Interview – Dr John Frame – Reformed Theological Seminary

logo 1) Please introduce yourself and your role at RTS.

john-frame John M. Frame, Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, FL.

2) Tell us a little about RTS.

RTS was started in 1966, in Jackson, MS., to train students for ministry. The school is committed to the authority of Scripture and the Reformed understanding of the Scriptures as found in documents like the Westminster Confession of Faith.

Today RTS has campuses in Jackson, Orlando, Charlotte, NC, Atlanta, GA, Washington, DC, Houston, TX, and Memphis, TN. We offer programs of study leading to the M. Div. degree, M. A. degrees in several fields, and D. Min.. We also have a program in counselling. Currently, there are 974 students enrolled for academic credit.

3) Are the courses full time, part-time or a mixture of both?

Our students are able to take our degree programs on either a full-time or a part-time basis.  20% of our students are considered full-time (12+ semester hours).

4) How do RTS students fund their studies?

The ideal scenario is for the student, their church, and RTS to each cover 33% of tuition.  Most students get some form of financial assistance from RTS and have to work to pay their living expenses. 

5) Does RTS take students from overseas?

Yes, many of our students come from outside the United States and currently there are 67 international students from all over the world.

6) What type of ministry is RTS intended to prepare students for?

RTS seeks to prepare all their students with a solid foundation in the Scriptures, the Reformed faith, and Missional mind-set in order to equip them to serve Christ wherever He would call them.

7) When students leave, what kind of ministries / jobs do they go into?

Most of RTS graduates go into vocational ministry that include pastoral, missions, counselling, chaplains, college/university ministries, and various para-church ministries.

8) What is distinctive about what RTS offers compared with other colleges in the US and overseas?

(1) Our commitment to Reformed theology and biblical inerrancy. (2) The high quality of scholarship on the faculty. (3) The diversity of our student body and seminary locations.

9) Please tell us about the library and other research facilities.

The Orlando library houses over 80,000 titles and another 100,000 in microform. In addition the resources of the other RTS libraries are easily accessible to RTS students, and there are a growing numbers of full-text electronic resources in biblical studies and theology that RTS students have access to.  In sum, the library fully supports the seminary’s MDiv curriculum, and it provides ways for faculty and students to conduct research beyond the curriculum.

10) Does RTS offer a distance or on-line learning option?


Yes. It is possible to earn three degrees from our Global Campus: the MABS, MATS, and the MAR (currently 455 students enrolled).  Many residential students take some classes through our Distance Education (currently 12%).  RTS-Orlando offers a Distance M.Div. for students who cannot move to campus.  This program allows a student to take up to 67% online and they can fulfil the 33% residential requirement via week-long intensives.



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My thanks to Professor Frame for taking part in this series.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

H. St John Thackeray on The Septuagint and Jewish Worship: A Study in Origins

The following Schweich Lectures are now available on-line:

H. St John Thackeray [1869-1930], The Septuagint and Jewish Worship: A Study in Origins. The Schweich Lecture 1920. London: Oxford University Press, 1921. Hbk. pp.143.

This material is now in the Public Domain.

Click <<HERE>> for the download link.

Monday, July 14, 2014

F. Crawford Burkitt on Jewish and Christian Apocalypses

The following Schweich Lectures are now available on-line in PDF:

F Crawford Burkitt [1864-1935], Jewish and Christian Apocalypses. The Schweich Lectures 1913. London: Oxford University Press, 1914. Hbk. pp.80.

This material is in the Public Domain.

Click <<HERE>> to visit the download page.

I am in the process of digitising about 6 more of the Schweich Lecture series - click HERE for the full list.

Blog Interview – Dr Stafford Carson – Union Theological College, Belfast

logo 1. Please introduce yourself and your role at Union Theological College.
Carson, Stafford My name is Stafford Carson. I am the Principal and Professor of Ministry at Union Theological College.

2. Tell us a little about Union Theological College.

Union Theological College is the denominational college of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland and a constituent college of the Institute of Theology at Queen’s University, Belfast. We have 240 students enrolled in both undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes. Thirty-nine of our students are in training for the ministry of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. We offer the Bachelor of Divinity degree, Bachelor of Theology, Master of Theology and Doctor of Philosophy degrees plus Graduate Diploma in Ministry and Diploma/Certificate in Youth Ministry.

3. Are the courses full time, part time or a mixture of both?
A mixture of part time and full time.

4. How do Union Theological College students fund their studies?
Through the Student Loan Company and through the Students’ Bursary Fund of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.

5. Does Union Theological College take student from overseas?

Yes.

6. What type of ministry is Union Theological College intended to prepare students for?

We prepare students for the ordained ministry of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, and many of our students use their theological education for a variety of careers in education, church-based ministry and community work.

7. When students leave Union Theological College what kind of ministries/jobs do they go into?

Ordained ministry of word and sacraments, youth ministry, community work.

8. What is distinctive about what Union Theological College offers compared with other colleges in the UK and overseas?

We are a distinctively reformed and Presbyterian college where all our faculty subscribe to the Westminster Confession of Faith and catechisms.

9. Please tell us about the library and other research facilities.


Our library, the Gamble Library, has over 70,000 books and 20,000 pamphlets and takes over 70 journals and periodicals. It is by far the largest theological library in Northern Ireland.


10. Does Union Theological College offer a distance or on-line learning option. 
No.

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My thanks to Revd Carson for taking part in this interview series.

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

A.W. Streane's The Age of the Maccabees now on-line

The following Public Domain book is available on-line in PDF:

A.W. Streane [1844-1915], The Age of the Maccabees with Special Reference to the Literature of the Period. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1898. Hbk. pp.227.

Click <<HERE>> to visit the download page.

Monday, July 07, 2014

Blog Interview – Dr David deSilva – Ashland Theological Seminary

logo 1) Please introduce yourself and your role at Ashland Theological Seminary.

deSilva 1 My name is David deSilva, and I serve as Trustees’ Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek at Ashland Theological Seminary.

2) Tell us a little about Ashland.

Ashland Seminary is a graduate division of Ashland University, a school founded in 1888 by members of the Brethren Church, with roots in German Anabaptist and Pietist movements.  The seminary is currently multi-denominational in scope, with over 700 students coming from about 70 different ecclesial bodies.  We offer Masters-level programs in biblical studies, historical and theological studies, practical theology, and counselling/mental health, as well as the Doctor of Ministry degree.

3) Are the courses full time, part-time or a mixture of both?

ATS 2 Students can proceed through any of our degrees essentially at the pace that their other responsibilities allow.  More students are part-time than full-time.

4) How do Ashland students fund their studies?

Most students have outside employment, which they use to fund their program.  Many also seek financial aid through federal grant and loan programs or through their church bodies.  Scholarships are becoming increasingly available thanks to the generosity of donors and the diligence of our development team.

5) Does Ashland take students from overseas?

Ashland has always welcomed international students, both for the privilege of teaching them and for the many ways in which they enrich everyone’s experience here.  Faculty and administration typically go out of their way to make international students feel connected and at home.

6) What type of ministry is Ashland intended to prepare students for?

ATS 1 About one-quarter of our students pursue the Master of Divinity degree, which is required for ordination and full-time ministry in several mainline denominations.  Another third pursue a degree in counselling with the goal of working in the mental health field in either a secular or Christian context, although they are particularly well-equipped to work with clients coming from a Christian world view.  Another quarter pursue a two-year Master of Arts with a view to entering or advancing ministry in a church that does not require the MDiv or to embarking upon some other form of Christian ministry, whether youth work, Christian education, or serving in a para-church context.  About one sixth are enrolled in the Doctor of Ministry program: many of these have already been serving churches for at least several years.

7) When students leave Ashland what kind of ministries / jobs do they go into.

See response to question #6.

8) What is distinctive about what Ashland offers compared with other colleges in the US and overseas?

Student surveys tells us that we do a very good job of teaching them to interpret Scripture, to communicate its challenge in preaching and teaching, and to think through issues theologically.  This is not distinctive, per se, but it is a strong statement about our ability to deliver, as it were, in areas traditionally of great importance for a seminary education.  I would say that our commitment as a faculty not only to the education of our students, but also to their formation as disciples and as Christian leaders, is a distinctive strength of our institution.  Our faculty is wholly committed not only to the disciplines that we teach, but also to the church that our students will serve and to the God to whom we must all give account.

9) Please tell us about the library and other research facilities.

We have a solid collection of about 80,000 books and periodicals on campus; a special arrangement with other Ohio libraries called OhioLINK makes virtually any book accessible to faculty and students.  For the occasional, truly arcane monograph there is “Inter-library Loan.”

10) Does Ashland offer a distance or on-line learning option. If yes, please tell us more about it.

We offer as many courses online as we do at any one of our physical locations; increasingly we are opening up “face-to-face” classes to remote populations through such video-conferencing tools as “WebEx.”  We hope to be able to offer complete degrees online (such as the MA in Practical Theology and MA in Biblical Studies) in the very near future.  Students can, however, currently complete more than half of any of our degrees from a remote location.  I personally teach several online or synchronous courses each year.








Friday, July 04, 2014

STEP Bible Software - helping to meet a need in the Church of the Two Thirds World

Many Christian scholars from overseas who have spent time studying in the UK return to their own countries find their ministry of training others to understand the Bible frustrated. This is because the in-depth Bible Study resources, so readily available in universities in the UK, are now out of their reach - both physically and financially. This is even more frustrating when one realises that about 85% of the evangelical churches in the Two Thirds World are led by people with no theological training at all. It is a problem that I have been aware of for many years - indeed it was the inspiration behind Theology on the Web - "making biblical scholarship accessible" which led me to launch my first website in 2001.


The folks at Tyndale House in Cambridge share this vision and are working hard to meet the need for biblical resources. For me it is always a pleasure to visit there and meet members of the team working on their Scripture Tools for Every Person (STEP) project. This software, now in Beta version 2.0, is already one of the most powerful original-language Bible study tools available and is intended to be made available free of charge. There are plans to add hundreds more Bible translations, secondary literature and other resources - see the slideshow here. If you haven't already visited the website - stepbible.org - I would strongly recommend that you do.

Here is a short video that gives a helpful introduction to just some of the things the STEP software can do:

Monday, June 30, 2014

Blog Interview – Willem J. de Wit – Evangelical Theological Seminary, Cairo

logo 1) Please introduce yourself and your role at Evangelical Theological Seminary in Cairo.

willem My name is Willem J. de Wit. Born in the Netherlands, I teach Biblical Studies and Systematic Theology at the Evangelical Theological Seminary in Cairo, Egypt.

2) Tell us a little about the Evangelical Theological Seminary in Cairo (ETSC).

This year we will celebrate our seminary’s founding by American Presbyterian missionaries 150 years ago. The seminary was originally housed on a boat that sailed over the Nile, so that students could combine studying with preaching the Gospel in villages. Nowadays, we have our main campus in Cairo and branches in Minya (250 km south of Cairo) and Alexandria (225 km north west of Cairo). Altogether, there are over three hundred students.

3) What programs does ETSC offer?

faculty
Some ETSC faculty and students in the library of the Center for Middle Eastern
 Christianity. Dr. Michael Parker (sitting) is ETSC’s Director of Graduate Studies.
Currently, our seminary is reviewing its curriculum and introducing new degree names. From fall 2014 onwards, we hope to offer the following degree programs:
  1. Master of Divinity (MDiv): a four year full-time program in Arabic that prepares students for ordination in the Evangelical Presbyterian Church in Egypt (the “Synod of the Nile”).
  2. Master of Arts in Theology (MAT): a four year part-time program  in Arabic (equivalent to two years full time), offering personal development, equipment for non-ordained ministry, and preparation for further studies.
  3. Master of Theology (ThM): a one year full-time or two year part-time advanced theological program, with specializations in Biblical Studies, Christianity in the Middle East, and Systematic Theology.
  4. Master of Arts in Organization Leadership (MAOL): a three to four year part-time non-theological program in English, combining general and Christian perspectives on leadership and management, offered in cooperation with Development Associates International.
From fall 2015 onwards, we also hope to offer some shorter certificate (non-degree) programs to serve various interests and needs.

4) How do ETSC students fund their studies?

students
ETSC Faculty
The seminary receives financial support both from churches and individuals in Egypt and from abroad, so that tuition fees can be kept relatively low.  For international students we are sometimes able to secure a scholarship.

5) Does ETSC take students from overseas?

Yes, certainly. Our programs in Arabic have drawn students from Sudan, Syria, Iraq, and other Middle Eastern countries. Our advanced program in English has received students from many nations: Norway, Syria, Italy, Korea, India, Sudan, Germany, etc

6) When students leave ETSC what kind of ministries / jobs do they go into?

Some ETSC students in front of the Mohammed Ali mosque
 at the citadel in Cairo.
Graduates of our ordination track usually become pastors in Egypt, especially in villages and in new church plants in ever-expanding Cairo. One recent graduate became a missionary pastor in Iraq and a soon-to-be graduate is currently serving half-time in Gaza. Graduates of our part-time programs usually use their degree to be better equipped for ministries in which they are currently serving
Graduates of our advanced program in English have become full-time or part-time faculty at our seminary and at seminaries in Sudan and in the United States. Some graduates have continued their studies overseas, at institutions like Princeton Theological Seminary and Yale Divinity School. One of them is now the head of our seminary library and another is the chairman of the board of our seminary. International graduates serve as pastors or in other positions in their home countries.

7) What is distinctive about what ETSC offers compared with other colleges in Egypt and overseas?

chapel
Inside the recently renovated chapel of ETSC.
Our seminary is one of the leading centers of Christian theology in the Arab speaking world. As a Presbyterian seminary we have welcomed students from many Protestant denominations and even some from Coptic Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches.
For international students, Egypt is a fascinating country: it is the second country of the Bible, has an incredible number of Pharaonic, Coptic, and Islamic monuments, and is the center of the Arab Spring. Compared to most Western countries, life is very cheap. Although mass demonstrations are now less common than during the last few years, our on-campus accommodation makes it easy for students to stay a day at home in case of unrest in the city.

Two types of international students will especially enjoy studying in Egypt at our seminary:

•    students interested in studying Christianity in the context of the Middle East and in an Islamic society;

•    non-native speakers of English who have a TOEFL score that is above 500 but just not high enough to be admitted to most schools in America or Europe—ETSC specializes in offering high quality theological education to people for whom English is a second language.

8) Please tell us about the library and other research facilities.

Students of the ordination program
during a conference last September
ETSC has two libraries on its main campus: a general theological library with some 50,000 volumes (half in English, half in Arabic) and a specialized research library in its Center for Middle Eastern Christianity (CMEC).

9) Does the Evangelical Theological Seminary in Cairo offer a distance or on-line learning option. If yes, please tell us more about it.

We offer programs in our branches in Minya and Alexandria. Next academic year we hope to start implementing on-line distance learning.

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My thanks to Willen de Wit for his contribution to series. ETSC publishes its own journal, the Cairo Journal of Theology. Please pray for the faculty of students of ETSC.